Najlaa El-Ageli

Pop Art From North Africa

Pop Art From North Africa: Curated by Najlaa El-Ageli and Toufik Douib, this collective exhibition will put together for the first time under the P21 Gallery roof, the artworks of fifteen creative individuals from North Africa who are all inspired by the Pop Art movement. Every country in the region is represented, including artists from Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Egypt and Libya as well as their diasporas living in Europe.

September - It is all in the North African Pop! You are all invited to the launch!

As a media partner with one incredible project, I will of course be partial here to highlight the 'Pop Art from North Africa' exhibition. Curated by my sister Najlaa El-Ageli and Toufik Douib, this collective show will put together for the first time under the P21 Gallery roof, the artworks of fifteen creative individuals from North Africa who are all inspired by the Pop Art movement, with every country in the region represented, including artists from: Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Egypt and Libya as well as their diasporas living in Europe.

The Jewelled Tales of Libya

The Jewelled Tales of Libya: Showcasing Libya’s antique silver jewellery and exploring the diversity and historical identity of the country through its fine pieces. This exhibition, curated by Najlaa El-Ageli and Hala Ghellali, will bring the rich cultural heritage to the wider public and aims to shed light on the story behind the jewellery and the symbols that feature heavily throughout the geographical expanse that we know as Libya. A parallel aspect will also be the vintage photography of Libyan women that are also from a historically valuable private collection.

Textural Threads: A Collective Show Redefining The Female Space And Emerging Art From MENA

United by what can only be described as the fearless feminine spirit, ‘Textual Threads’ brings five strong emerging artists who will inspire you, challenge you and make you marvel at the different creative ways each has chosen to approach some of the difficult topics impacting on the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region today, whilst also offering internal transformations. With a womanly abandon in the use and choice of highly different textures and methods, what is pertinent to the Arab is here revealed and with a great cross-section of origins coming from Syria, Libya, Algeria, Saud