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05feb(feb 5)09:0024mar(mar 24)18:00Journeys DrawnIllustration from the Refugee Crisis(february 5) 09:00 - (march 24) 18:00

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Illustration from the Refugee Crisis: An exhibition telling refugee stories, both observed and experienced first-hand, through illustration. This first of its kind in the UK, it features 40 multi-media works by 12 contemporary artists, two of whom are themselves refugees. For example, the show features Iranian artist Majid Adin’s award-winning animation for Elton John’s ‘Rocket Man’, which draws on his own journey to the UK, as he had been imprisoned for his political works in Iran and was smuggled to London inside a refrigerator, before winning a competition to reimagine the iconic ballad! The exhibition also includes war zone reportage by George Butler from Syria, Olivier Kugler’s digital portraits of refugees arriving on the Greek Island of Kos and Kate Evans’ graphic novel that recounts her experience of volunteering in the Calais Jungle.

Time

February 5 (Tuesday) 09:00 - March 24 (Sunday) 18:00

Location

House Of Illustration

2 Granary Square, King's Cross London N1C 4BH

Organizer

House Of Illustrationexhibitions@houseofillustration.org.uk 2 Granary Square, King's Cross London N1C 4BH

13feb(feb 13)10:0006may(may 6)18:00Kader Attia: The Museum of Emotion(february 13) 10:00 - (may 6) 18:00

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The French-Algerian Kader Attia has a first UK survey exhibition that traces several strands of the artist’s work from the past two decades.

Defining himself as an activist as well as an artist, Attia has over the past twenty years set out to create artworks that engage our capacity for thinking as well as feeling, and provoke what he calls a ‘real, fundamental dialogue’ about the world in which we live.

In sculptures, installations, collages, videos and photographs that move ‘back and forth between politics and poetry’, Attia inventively explores the ways in which colonialism continues to shape how Western societies represent and engage with non-Western cultures, and offers a passionate critique of modern Western systems of control that define everything from traditional museology to the design of modernist social housing.

A key group of works in ‘The Museum of Emotion’ engage with the idea of repair as both a physical and symbolic act. These include objects ‘repaired’ by the artist using techniques and materials employed in certain non-Western cultures, as well as videos and large-scale installations that explore the way in which repair relates to psychological as well as physical injury, and to collective as well as individual trauma.

Attia transforms detailed research into compelling works of art, and at the same time probes the ways in which the museum itself might be transformed into a forum for emotional response, capable of eliciting, exploring and even harnessing strongly held feelings of anger, sorrow, joy and grief.

This exhibition is supported by Qatar Museums Doha, Outset Contemporary Art Fund, The London Community Foundation and Cockayne – Grants for the Arts and the Yanghyun Foundation.

Time

February 13 (Wednesday) 10:00 - May 6 (Monday) 18:00

Location

Southbank Centre

Southbank Centre, 337-338 Belvedere Rd, London SE1 8XX

01mar18:0029(mar 29)18:00Dressing/Undressing the LandscapeThe AWAN Festival 18:00 - 18:00 (29)

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Event Details

Curated by Yara Sharif from Palestine Regeneration Team (PART), ‘Dressing/Undressing the Landscape’ explores means to rethink the current cultural landscape of the Middle East. In a dialogue between architecture, art and spatial design, female architects and artists from the Arab world and beyond, bring forward new insights to the cities of Gaza, Mosul, Baghdad, Damascus, Beirut, Ramallah and the rural villages of Palestine.

The works provoke the current geography of the Middle East and the way it is being represented, exploited and imagined – especially with the on-going colonial project that continues to dress it with alien layers and new sceneries.

The contributors question through design, what might a landscape crafted by women be like? They offer alternatives that resist the legislated power of men, the power of war and the power of image, which have been constantly reinvented.

The exhibitors taking part are: PART, Yara Sharif, Hemali Rathod, Julia Tople, Sakiya: Art, Science, Agriculture, Sahar Qawasmi, Rim Kalsoum, Hiba Al-Safi, Nuha Hansen, Angeliko Sakellariou, Dana Nasser, May Sayrafi and Samar Maqusi.

As part of the exhibition, there will also be a panel discussion on Arab cities and the making, redefining and reclaiming of public space, on 9 March, as part of AWAN’s Festival at the Rich Mix venue’s main space from 14.00 – 16.00pm.

AWAN, which is about to enter its 5th edition, showcases the work of contemporary Arab women artists in the UK, Europe and beyond, providing opportunities for artists and audiences to celebrate, be informed and network whilst exposing new audiences to the work of emerging and established artists.  It is produced by Arts Canteen and supported by Rich Mix.

Time

1 (Friday) 18:00 - 29 (Friday) 18:00

Location

Rich Mix London

35 - 47 Bethnal Green Road, E1 6LA London, United Kingdom

11mar(mar 11)10:0027(mar 27)18:00Sand And Vision 2019 - Freedom ProjectA Photographic & Sound Exhibition By Uoung Sahrawi Refugees In Partnership With Olive Branch Arts10:00 - 18:00 (27)

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A photographic and sound exhibition by young Sahrawi refugees in partnership with Olive Branch Arts. It celebrates the work of the photographers and musicians who took part in residencies hosted by the organisation at refugee camps.

Branch Arts work creatively and therapeutically with refugee communities in the UK and abroad, and are committed to building relationships across communities to promote love, dignity and care for all people who seek refuge. They have been creatively engaging with the Sahrawi refugee community in SW Algeria since 2010; running annual youth-theatre residencies, working therapeutically with elders in the Land Mine Victim Centre and with children and staff from the Special Needs Schools in the region.

In October 2017 and 2018, Olive Branch Arts Creative Director Becky Finlay Hall and Associate Artist Emma Brown ran Olive Branch Arts’ first two Photo-Voice based participatory photography training programmes. The theme of ‘freedom’ came up when a young Sahrawi photographer asked “How do you photograph freedom?” This exhibition of image and sound is a response to that question, and it also includes sounds and songs from Sahrawi musicians and London based musicians Matt King Smith and Jessica Wilde, who ran a parallel music project on the camps to respond to the question “What does freedom sound like?”

By offering participants a safe place to come together and learn new skills, Olive Branch Arts aim to develop confidence in young refugees, to enable them to visually document their own stories and reduce the isolation of a remote refugee community through the sharing of photography.

Time

11 (Monday) 10:00 - 27 (Wednesday) 18:00

Location

Olive Branch Arts

Regents Place, 10 Triton Street, London NW1 3BF

14mar(mar 14)10:0024(mar 24)19:00Colours of Syria10:00 - 19:00 (24)

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Event Details

The pop-up art exhibition ‘Colours of Syria’ presents the awe-inspiring natural landscape of Syria in glorious colour. The paintings and collages on display are infused with the essential beauty and energy of the country. Meanwhile, drawings and photographs in rich tones and darker shades give expression to the inner resilience of Syrian people.

Malva’s painting ‘Willow Tree’, in shades of olive, eau-de-nil and ochre, takes us to one of Syria’s verdant valleys, with weeping willow branches trailing in a shimmering river. Akil Ahmad’s more abstract paintings, with their dynamic calligraphic marks in golden beige and luminous scarlet, evoke Syria’s wide, open spaces. One, inspired by a poem by the first-century writer Al-Mutanabi, conjures up a misty dawn, and the other, a sunset.

Adib Fattal’s crayon drawings in magenta, hot pink and turquoise, with titles such as ‘Palmyra’, ‘Damascus Citadel’, ‘The Hosn Castle’, depict historic places in Syria. They remind us of the intense play of sunlight on the brightly coloured architecture, and of the pattern-making and exuberant use of colour in traditional Syrian textiles and mosaics.

In luminous black and white photographs by Assem Hamsho, we are presented with his vision of a moment or place. We see the patterns of shadows of people at leisure, the play of light and shade. Jaber Alwan portrays an elegant and beautiful woman, the green and yellow and red of her dress dazzling in the darkness, as she dreams, or imagines, or waits.

Of Adel Daood’s paintings, the art historian Clara Kaufmann writes: “They are portraits of human nature or humanity itself, portraits of felt, sensed, lived and imagined lives. Dauood’s inspiration pieces his pictures together: a foot here, a face there, arms growing out of a vortex of lines, body parts and bright colours.”

The following artists complete the line-up, with artworks that touch on story-telling or allude to intense psychological states via vivid colours and dynamic patterns and lines: Shadi Abou Saada, Hiba Akkad, Farah Azrak, Tammam Azzam, Fadi Hamwi, Mohamad Labash and Gylan Safadi.

‘Colours of Syria’ is presented by Litehouse Gallery, a start-up online platform linked to ‘Art Residence Aley’, an art residency programme founded by Raghad Mardini in Lebanon in 2012, which supports Syrian artists, including through the promotion and sale of their artworks worldwide.

Time

14 (Thursday) 10:00 - 24 (Sunday) 19:00

Location

Litehouse Gallery London

Litehouse Gallery London, 82 Westbourne Grove, London W2 5RT

22mar(mar 22)19:0027(mar 27)22:00BBC Arabic Festival 2019BBC World Service19:00 - 22:00 (27)

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Event Details

The BBC Arabic Festival is an annual programme of international short films and documentaries about today’s Arab world. The festival is free and open to everyone. Our unique and timely programme includes screenings, talks and exclusive presentations by award-winning journalists and filmmakers. The festival finale brings the best of music and comedy from the Arab world.

All the events take place at the iconic art-deco BBC Radio Theatre in central London. Tickets are free and will be allocated on a first come first served basis. Visit the individual listings for more details about each one.

You can apply for tickets to as many sessions as you like.

Time

22 (Friday) 19:00 - 27 (Wednesday) 22:00

Location

BBC Radio Theatre

BBC Broadcasting House, Portland Place, London W1A 1AA

24mar19:0022:30El Far3i Live at Balabam19:00 - 22:30

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Event Details

El Far3i’s (47SOUL) music can be described as a mixture of Hip Hop, Arabic Folk and Acoustic Rap and Arabic poetry. He believes in the power of his music and exploring and adapting the lyrics to fit the current social and political conditions.

El Far3i is a Palestinian Jordanian songwriter, percussionist and vocalist based in London, founder of Arabic Folk and Acoustic Rap solo act (El Far3i) and Hip-Hop Mc Far3 El Madakhil. Inspired by the surroundings and the high-speed changes, El far3i shares his thoughts and visions in verses, grooves and melodies from the eastern side of The River Jordan to the outer world and back.

El Far3i means coming from a branch which is a symbol of growth and reaching outwards to the world by feeding from the roots.

Time

(Sunday) 19:00 - 22:30

Location

Balabam

Balabam, 58-60 High Road, LondonN15 6JU

26mar(mar 26)20:0014apr(apr 14)22:00Ali and DahliaPart of the Pleasance Theatre's #YouWillKnowTheirNames Season 20:00 - (april 14) 22:00

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Event Details

Love, sacrifice, occupation and redemption meet in actor-playwright Tariq Jordan’s powerful debut, ‘Ali and Dahlia’. Directed by Kerry Kyriacos Michael (Former Artistic Director & Chief Executive of Theatre Royal Stratford East) and supported by Arts Council England, Jordan’s heart-breaking, funny and powerful play makes its world premiere at the Pleasance, Islington.

Having been accused of rioting, Ali awaits his fate in an Israeli interrogation room but when an old lover steps in to question him, the two are forced to confront their past, finding themselves torn between bitter loyalties. A funny, moving and thought-provoking Palestinian-Israeli love story, Ali and Dahlia is set against the backdrop of the construction of the West Bank wall. A story of love, occupation, sacrifice and redemption, it also takes an unflinching look at loss of innocence, the longing for lost homelands and the political forces that shape both individual lives and countries.

Jordan, who grew up in Manchester before moving to London, aged 12 is an Iraqi-Jew who has dual Arab-Muslim and European-Jewish heritage. ‘Ali and Dahlia’ was inspired by his trip to Palestine in 2014 where he was detained for 12 hours and interrogated throughout the night.

He said: ”The seed for Ali and Dahlia was planted during a 12-hour overnight interrogation in Tel Aviv airport where I was given an ultimatum: renounce my Jewish roots, which were ‘stained’ by my mother marrying a Muslim, or risk being sent to a detention centre and deported. It was during this time that I was told point-blank that my mother was ‘filthy’ for having me with an Arab. Upon my release I felt a change in me, it galvanised my efforts to tell the stories of my own experiences growing up with Jewish and Muslim roots and transformed them from ones in which I had always wanted to tell, to ones I now needed to tell.”

Time

March 26 (Tuesday) 20:00 - April 14 (Sunday) 22:00

Location

Pleasance Theatre

Pleasance Theatre, Carpenters Mews North Road, London N7 9EF

 

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